Why we should not be killing “pests”

When a species is arbitrarily defined as a pest species, there is little that can be done to prevent its ultimate destruction. The cockroach is one of the few species to fall under the threat of humans so completely and to survive with such panache.

Endangered Species

The other species that have suffered and fallen have left human culture and the planet Earth much poorer, and have removed critical environmental resources from our reach. From the wooly mammoth to the endangered water buffalo, and other species that have been lost to time, the human extermination of creatures seemingly knows no bounds.

Whether through over consumption or irritation at the animal’s existence, the removal of the critter is one way that humans prove they are unfit to live in the world.

Are they really “pests”?

Defining what is a “pest” and what is a beneficial species is impossible from a human perspective. Our point of view is too skewed to understand the harsh consequences of removing a part of the ecological chain. The ramifications of a mistake can be devastating.

Additionally, humans are hampered by a moment in time understanding of science. There were species that were classified as pests in past years which are sorely missed today. The manner of management of the animals would be different now, and the definition of the relationship of human to animal would not reach “pest” status.

The human relationship to anything, in fact, requires that the “pest” status be a moment in time definition since the irritation required is not something that’s sustainable.

Depending on the impacts to the life and health of the human population, the Fructoselang Organization supports the separation of some species of animals from the human population. However, we cannot support the elimination or removal of a population from the world.

This half understood, permanent decision is one that could have long term effects on our very existence, and we know we are not smart enough to handle this decision.